2019 CUGH Conference    I    March 8 - 10, 2019   I   Satellite Sessions  March 7, 2019   |   Hilton  Chicago Hotel    I   Chicago, IL​​

| Agenda | Day 3 | Sunday, March 10, 2019

9:00AM-10:30AM
Room:

CS33: CONCURRENT SESSION 
Gun Violence in the Americas
Gun Violence is the 21st century disease of modern societies. The Americas are home to 47 of the world’s top 50 most violent cities. While Chicago and other US cities do not rank in the top 50 of this index overall, homicide rates of African American male youth are comparable to some of the highest rates in the hemisphere. This panel seeks to build on the public health model of addressing gun violence by highlighting innovative evidence-based anti- violence approaches, and outline progress towards the 2030 sustainable goals.

Introduction: 
Stephen Hargarten, Associate Dean for Global Health, Director of the Comprehensive Injury Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA

Moderator: 
- Jeremy Biddle, Coordinator, Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI) at USAID

Speakers: 
- Roseanna Anders,  Executive Director, University of Chicago Crime Lab and Education Lab, USA
- Santiago Uribe, Chief Resilience Officer, City of Medellin, Colombia
- Arturo Cervantes, Professor and chair of public health, and Anahuac University Mexico, Faculty of Health Sciences, Mexico
- Susan Bissell, Chief of Child Protection, Programme Division Unicef, retired. Former Director of the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children

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9:00AM-10:30AM
Room:

CS34: CONCURRENT SESSION 
Recommendations for Research from the Committee on Improving the Quality of Health Care Globally
"Crossing the Global Quality Chasm: Improving Health Care Worldwide” is a consensus study by the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM). It addresses quality of care as “a serious obstacle to improving health among the world's poorest and most marginalized people.” NASEM committee members and others will address the report findings and recommendations, including an aspirational vision for health care systems as they adopt emerging digital health technologies and a targeted implementation science research agenda for increased knowledge on health care quality and quality improvement. Attendees can discuss the report with the report committee and others.

Moderators:
- Wafaa El-Sadr, University Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine, Director, ICAP at Columbia University, USA 
- Peter Kilmarx, Deputy Director, Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, USA

Speakers:
- Mohammad Ali, Associate Professor in the Hubert Department of Global Health and Department of Epidemiology at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health, USA
- Millicent Olulo, Country Director, PharmAccess Kenya and Program Director, SafeCare Kenya
-  Marcel Yotebieng,  College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, USA; School of Public Health , University of Kinhasa, Democratic Republic of Congo 
-  Neeraj Sood, Vice Dean for Research, Director of Research, University of Southwern California Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, USAV
  
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9:00AM-10:30AM
Room: 

CS35: CONCURRENT SESSION
The Warp and the Weft: Interweaving Child Development into Health Programs in Resource-poor Settings
Health and development are interwoven in their risks and protective factors, but not enough in their implementation, particularly in impoverished settings globally. These risks to development such as poverty, malnutrition, disease, violence/political instability and maternal depression threaten both health and children’s development. This symposium will present programs from three of our collaborators who are successfully integrating early child development activities into established health programs in Africa (Pediatric development clinic in rural Rwanda), Central (community-based malnutrition amelioration in a rural indigenous Maya community in Guatemala) and South America (community-based caregiver support and coaching in developmentally supportive parenting in urban Lima, Peru).

Moderator:
- Ann C. Miller, Principal Associate/Epidemiologist, Harvard Medical School, USA

Speakers:
- Christine Mutaganzwa, Pediatric Development Clinic Director, Partners In Health, Rwanda
- Peter Rohloff, Chief Medical Officer, Wuqu’ Kawoq, Guatemala
- Nancy Rumaldo, Project Coordinator, Socios en Salud, Peru

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9:00AM-10:30AM
Room:

CS36: CONCURRENT SESSION
Global Health Humanities: Scope of an Emerging Field in Global Health?
the field of Global Health Humanities (GHH) is a relatively new but burgeoning field in global health. With many health professionals and medical schools being established in LMICs (and HICs), there is an urgency to develop (within clinical curricula) humanities programs that are at once contextualy appropriate and not overly-tethered to the Western cannon of humanities. But also outsde of academia nad health professional education, emergent areas in GHH - such as global health ethics and law; copassionate patient care; inter-cultural sensitivity; burnout in global health/humanitarian work; and global storytelling - have a critical role to play in holistically enhancing the education, training and workplace effectiveness of global health interprofessional workers. at CUGH, the Education Committee recently established a GHH Working Group, as a space where members interestd in a broad range of topics in GHH can interact, engage in discussion, and develop collaborative projects. This panel will define and describe field of GHH through a series of perspective talks on a range of topics in the field, with the goal of generating discussion and collaborative participation among the broader CUGH global community.

Moderator:
- Quentin Eichbaum, Professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Professor of Medical Education and Administration, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, USA

Speakers:
- Charles-Antoine Barbeau-Meunier,
Medical Student, Global Health Advocate, Sherbrook Neuro Analysis nad Imaging Lab, Canada
- David Addiss, Adjunct Professor, Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory Center for Ethics, USA
- Lise Saffran, Director, Masters of Public Health Program, University of Missouri, USA
- Mary White, Professor, Department of Population and Public Health Sciences, and Director, Medical Humanities, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, USA
Quentin Eichbaum, Professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Professor of Medical Education and Administration, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, USA

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​9:00AM-10:30AM
Room:

CS37: CONCURRENT SESSION
ORAL ABSTRACT PRESENTATION:

DETAILS TBA

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​9:00AM-10:30AM
Room: 

CS38: CONCURRENT SESSION 
ORAL ABSTRACT PRESENTATION:

DETAILS TBA

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​9:00AM-10:30AM

Room: 

CS39: CONCURRENT SESSION
First Do No Harm: How Do We Address Clinician and Trainees Practicing Outside their Scope of Training Under the Auspices of "Global Health"?


Research has emerged that 40% of health professionals an trainees taking part in short-term Global Health activities abroad in low resource settings are asked to practice beyond their scope of training, while at least 60% go on to actually do so. Further, data suggests that the health professionals and trainees experience significant moral distress, guilt, frustration, and conflict around this phenomenon. This panel of experts and practioners will discuss the latest research in this area, as well as mult-pronged approaches to address the challenges faced by sending institutions, hosting institutions, health professionals, trainees, patients, administrators, and other stakeholders.

Moderator:
- Jessica Evert, Executive Director, CFHI; Assistant Clinical Professor, UCSF Department of Family and Community Medicine, USA

Speakers:
- Ashti Doobay-Persaud, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine, and Associate Director of Global Health Graduate Education, Center for Global Health, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, USA

- Charles Chineme Nwobu, Medical Director, CFHI-Ghana, World Medical Assocation, Junior Doctors Network, Ghana
- Judith Lasker, Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Lehigh University, USA
- Jessica Evert, Executive Director, CFHI; Assistant Clinical Professor, UCSF Department of Family and Community Medicine, USA

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​9:00AM-10:30AM

Room:

CS40: CONCURRENT SESSION
ORAL ABSTRACT PRESENTATION:

DETAILS TBD

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​10:30AM-10:45AM
HEALTH BREAK

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​​10:45AM-12:15PM
Room: 

PS09: PLENARY SESSION
Reducing the Global Mental Health Treatment Gap Through Implementation Innovations
Globally, mental health disorders are responsible for 23% of disability, yet only 3 of 4 persons get the treatment they need. Closing the mental health treatment gap is a top global health priority. The global mental health movement has made significant progress in better characterizing the mental health needs in LMICs, developing intervention approaches which can work in low resource settings, reducing stigma in societies not previously supportive of humane crae for the mentally ill, developing mental health prevention and promotion strategies, integrating mental health care into primary care and communities, and building mental health research capacities in LMICs. This panel of global mental health leaders will showcase the progress and challenges in global mental health.

Moderator:
- Stevan Weine, Director of Global Medicine & Director, Center for Global Health, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA

Speakers: 
Mary M. McKay, Neidorff Family and Centene Corporation Dean of hte Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
- Florence Baingana, Research Fellow, Makerere University School of Public Health, Uganda
- Pamela Y. Collins, Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences & Global Health, University of Washington, USA

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​12:15PM-1:30PM
LUNCH BREAK 

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​​1:30PM-3:00PM
Room: Sutton Center 

PS10: PLENARY SESSION 
Perspectives  on 100&Change: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation's Global Competition for Bold Solutions to Critical Problems of Our Time

100&Change is a distinctive competition that invited proposals promising real progress toward solving a critical problem of our time in any field or any location. In 2017, MacArthur awarded a $100 milion grant to Sesame Workshop and International Rescue Committee to education young children displaced by conflict and persecution in the Middle East. Three additional finalists received grants of $15 million each to eliminate hidden hunger in Africa by fortifying staple crops, improve newborn survial in Africa, and change how society cares for children in orphanages. This panel will disuss progress to date on the horizon - with a specific focus on using research for action.

Moderator:
- Sola Olopade, Professor of Medicine and Director, International Programs, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, USA

Speakers:
- Kara Palamountain, Research Associate Professor and Lecturer of Global Health, Northwestern University, USA
- Shannon Senefeld, Senior Vice President of Overseas Operations, Catholic Relief Services, USA
- Anna Marie-Ball, Director, External Affairs and Chief of Staff, HarvestPlus (IFPRI), USA
- Rene Celaya, Managing Director, Sesame Workshop, USA
- Katie Murphy, Senior Technical Advisor of Early Childhood Development, International Rescue Committee, USA

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​3:00PM-3:15PM
Room:

SUMMARY AND CLOSING SESSION

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